Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Movie Yasmin Essay

‘Yasmin is remarkable as a film for its cinematic economy: not a scene, shot or speech is wasted. ’ Explore some elements of the film in relation to this statement. The movie Yasmin, released in 2004 and written by the highly acclaimed writer of The Full Monty, Simon Beaufoy, is an impressive drama about what it means to be an Asian-looking Muslim in Britain of the 21st Century. The story is about the young and vivid Yasmin, a woman who tries to â€Å"succeed, by the skin of her teeth,†[1] in the two worlds she grew up in.On the one hand there is her life at home with her believing father and rebellious little brother, for whom she has to mark â€Å"time as a dutiful Muslim wife until her arranged marriage can be terminated. â€Å"[2] On the other hand there is her life outside this domesticity, where she is â€Å"like a fugitive, maintaining a double life as she changes into Western clothes, wins employee of month award at work and goes to the pub with colleag ues. â€Å"[3] One of the main topics of the movie is the difficult tension between being a religious and respectful woman and integrating into the Western society.Another important theme in the movie is the impact that the terror attacks in September 2001 had on the British Asian community in Britain. Yasmin’s story therefore deals with a wide range of themes such as discrimination, guilt, and the progress of searching for one’s own identity. It is especially â€Å"remarkable as a film for its cinematic economy (since) not a scene, shot or speech is wasted. † There are no fill-ups in this movie, everything has a meaning. This essay will explore some carefully chosen scenes of the movie concerning its sometimes hidden or masked intention and meaning.It will therefore especially concentrate on the beginning scene, which is regarded as being â€Å"the strongest part of the film†[4]. A closer look at the opening of the film is worth it since every well comp osed novel or film is creating a deliberate relationship between the beginning and the rest of the movie. It will be examined in the following, that additionally in the case of Yasmin the directors develop a consistency, a pattern of the main themes of the film, in the beginning.Everything is already there in the very first three and a half minutes; things shown in the opening reappear later in the movie; conflicts the film deals with can already be assumed in moves, placements, and pictures. It will be proven that, if taken into account every detail, every shot of the scene, the viewer will already be able to see the whole film in miniature in the beginning. The essay will therefore also have a closer look on what is shown in the opening scene and will then search for coherences and connections throughout the rest of the movie.It will hereby not go through the scene chronologically but will pick up separate shots of it and put them together in categories; although it will start wit h the first shot to which the viewer is introduced in the movie. When Khalid, Yasmin? s father, lopes over a typical grey English street followed by Nazir, Yasmin? s brother, a few steps behind him, Nazir? s bearing strikes the viewer immediately: the way he creeps a few steps behind his father with the hands in his pockets expresses discouragement, maybe even irritation.He seems to be unhappy with the situation, possibly because it? s too early in the morning, since gentle beams of sunrise just touch the wall behind them; possibly because he dislikes the purpose of their walk. His father, however, hastens to raise this purpose: in his hurry he turns around to see where his son has got to. It becomes clear that it is the father who controls the situation— that he is the leader whom the son has to follow. So apart from the obvious, the authority person walking in front might tell the viewer something about the relation between father and son.One could even go further and sugge st it might also tell something about their attitude towards life, about their religion, about the way the head of the family is treated in the Islam faith. The scene therefore implicates the parental respect of which is set value in this family. How important this topic is to Yasmin? s father Khalid becomes more and more clear during the course of the movie: he repeatedly calls for respect towards the parental authority over his children. When Yasmin is complaining about her husband and gives him humiliating names, Khalid reprehends her immediately and stresses his will with a slight slap.He even repudiates Yasmin when she dares to apply for a divorce against his will. So the viewer already gets in this very first scene, in the very first seconds, an initial impression of what domestic life in this family is about: about respect and family ties. The two move on and finally arrive at the mosque, which is gated by a metallic blind. After abandoning their shoes, Nazir and Khalid enter the interior of the mosque; and in doing so they pace over a formidable carpet in a remarkable red. It s admirable how strikingly this little scene influences the movie? s atmosphere: after the grey and dusty outside of the mosque with its bleak stone-walls and metallic blinds covering the entrance, the viewer now gets an impression of the inside; the colourful, bright, shining red carpet. The jump is a quiet astonishing little moment: the greyness outside opposes the bright shining colour of the huge carpet these seemingly little people are crossing (amplified by the way the scene is shot: with bird? eye view). Inside the mosque the viewer gets a sense of richness, a glimpse on the whole tradition, an idea about the Islam faith. The scene is not just remarkable because of its visual orchestration, but also in introducing the viewer to this huge and rich religion and the way it sees the world. Later in the beginning scene there is a shot that shows the grey and grim wall of a Yorks hire stone house in the front, again contrasted by the beautiful outlines of the colourful mosque in the background.The two absolutely different styles of architecture standing next to each other implicate a huge imagery: the mosque as a symbol for the tradition and a stonewall which symbolizes the here and now, indicates how the life of the Muslim people in Great Britain stands side by side with the traditional life of the British natives. This deliberate expression of a coexistence of the two traditions is an expression of crossing cultures at its best in this movie, and at this point of the movie it also stands for a successful integration of the Muslim tradition into the British society.This impression is furthermore stressed during the course of the beginning scene: the mosque is using modern techniques; it is using the loudspeaker, the microphone, so a lot of quite modern technology. Satellites are shown. Here the movie is not only supposing the ageing culture of Islam against the modern British culture of science and technology but goes further: it brings it together. There is an interchange going on here through what the viewer can hear (the singing of Nazir) and what he can see (the loudspeakers and satellites).By bringing these aspects together at the same time the fusion becomes immediately clear to the viewer. In another shot of the beginning scene the viewer observes the vivid life of the Muslim community that is taking place in the streets of the town. Even though one quickly might suggest that this shot might be just a fill-up it, in fact, goes further: the viewer here gets an impression of what the life in this Muslim community is like. The reason for that is that later in the film, after the 11th of September 2001, the same streets are depicted deserted, isolated, dead.Whereas the beginning scene expresses the successful integration of the Muslim tradition into the British society, the contrasting scene in the middle of the movie now stands fo r the failure of this coexistence, for the loss of community. The remarkable contrast of this two scenes is to â€Å"illuminate Muslims' increasing disenchantment with Western society†[5] after the terror attacks. So it now comes clear that nothing in the movie is there without reason: showing a typical East-Asian community in a British town is not a fill-in but is a part of the whole effort of later showing a community being disrupted. Nothing in the movie is wasted.One of the most impressing returning scenes of the movie is Nazir singing in front of the microphone. Also this theme is introduced in the beginning scene: after watching the film the first time, the peaceful scene in the beginning immediately reminds the viewer to the very last scene in the movie, when Khalid, the father is putting in a tape into the recorder as an ersatz for the son. This final scene has a huge impact on the viewer since one here really realizes that Nazir has gone off and will not come back. I t is therefore a really tragic little moment: it is emotional even though there is no actor playing the emotion.What is on the first glance less striking but not less important is that the image of the son singing comes back three times during the course of the movie; in the beginning, in the middle, and in the end. It runs through the film like a red thread: in the beginning it is, as said, introducing not only to the family? s religion but also to the family background itself. In the scene in the middle of the movie Nazir, before he starts, coughs as if he smoked too much. Since the viewer knows that he started â€Å"indulg(ing) in petty drug dealing and consorting with local girls†[6], it seems as if he became corrupted by what he is doing with his life.His coughing therefore is again not without meaning but stands for Nazir? s life becoming more difficult to handle. The returning scene is a marker in the film and each time it means something different: in the beginning it is quite straight forward, in the middle it appears as a comment for what happened to Nazir and his life, and in the end it is tragic since he is gone and will never come back. So as a major thread throughout the movie the scene with the singing Nazir displays the different states the movie and its protagonists are currently in. A similar red thread s the theme of dressing and clothes that recurs throughout the film and, again, the theme is already introduced in the opening. By watching Yasmin changing her clothes hidden by one of the typical grey stone-walls one gets an impression of this girl transforming herself into another person. Yasmin makes an enormous effort of putting herself into the trousers, since they are really too tight. She tries hard to fit herself in, she even has to jump up and down. The connection is easy to make: this movie is about someone who tries to fit in with two different worlds, tries to force herself in.So here the choice of incredibly tight trousers simply indicate what Yasmin really wants: she wants to make herself fit. If something returns deliberately, a number of times, during the film it becomes a symbolic act: when Yasmin for example dresses up to revolt against her father later in the movie, it symbolizes Yasmin? s wish to break out, to be able to be herself. In the end of the film she switches to traditional Muslim clothes, since she is at this point of the movie staying in the side of the traditional. Here the clothes express how a religious thought became fixed and hardened. Dressing here becomes a signifier for her state of mind.Since it returns later in the movie several times it always tells the viewer something when it comes to clothes. So by following how the dressing in this movie changes throughout the plot one gets a neat impression of how the state of Yasmin’s mind changes with it. The clothes are never chosen without reason in Yasmin, there is an intention in every piece the actors wear. Even though i t is just a little detail it strikes the viewer and is therefore very well-thought. So after Yasmin changed her clothes she turns over to her car and plays around with it: she locks and unlocks it with her remote control several times.This car is, as Yasmin later in the movie declares, not a ? t. p. car`, a ? typical paki-car`, but a sporty, feminine little cabriolet in an outstanding red. With this car, she wants to separate herself from those typical Pakistani people, and, even further, wants to declare her independence: â€Å"it gives her a life away from her husband and her home†[7]. By buying this car she is able to show herself and everybody else that she is different, what makes it an act of almost deliberate despair. But on the other hand, by playing around with the car, she expresses her excitement.She does it simply because she can. This gives the viewer a sense of how she is playing with things she owns, how she creates the parts of the world around her she can con trol in the way she likes it. The motif also returns later in the movie, after 9/11: Yasmin gets in the car and there is a news report on the radio about the terror-attacks. Yasmin? s reaction is as playfully as in the beginning of the movie: she just puts a CD in, and listens to the music. She does simply not want to think about, does not want to care. The viewer gets an impression of the ambiguity of Yasmin? life, of how difficult it must be to live in two different worlds, to create her life successfully around the different expectations the people she deals with have of her. The last shot of the opening scene in the movie depicts this challenge in a deliberate way: it shows the long, small, winding road Yasmin has to take day by day to drive to work and back. This road is the connection of the two worlds she lives in; it is a connecting thread between not only two different locations but two different worlds. Yasmin is having this journey – this transformation, this strug gle – every day.By driving over this street she is migrating from one world to another and she has to transform herself before she is accomplished with the migration, since she changes her identity day by day. Furthermore the road is connecting the two different worlds as well as dividing them. That becomes clear through the visual impact of this shot: the road is crossing the whole screen and Yasmin and her little car have to follow its way through the landscape; it deliberately makes the viewer ask: how long will it take her? And how long will she stand this?The struggle of â€Å"balancing two separate worlds in quest to please (a) conservative family, without sacrificing the obvious advantages of the Western environment†[8] is depicted as lovely and rich in detail in the movie Yasmin. It is â€Å"the beautifully realised opening, entirely without dialogue for a good few minutes, (that) is the strongest part of the film†[9] as it, as shown, already gives the w hole of the movie, its main conflicts, themes and topics in miniature. Although this is a primarily visual scene, dialogue, if used in the movie, is very effectively— â€Å"Not a scene, shot or speech is wasted. But the dialogue is used economically and not in the opening: it is a visual opening; in general, Yasmin is a visual movie. Every scene, every act, every piece of clothing has a meaning. As the director of the movie, Kenny Glenaan himself, says: â€Å"obviously the beauty is what you can do within the frame and some people are amazing at doing that. â€Å"[10] Bibliography Dilks, Richard, Yasmin, in Close-Up Film, 2003, http://www. close-upfilm. com/reviews/y/yasmin. htm Docherty, Alan, Yasmin – Kenny Glenaan, in Culture Wars, 2001, http://www. culturewars. org. uk/2004-02/yasmin. tm Glenaan, Kenny, in a BBC Interview, last updated in September 2004, http://www. bbc. co. uk/films/festivals/edinburgh/yasmin. shtml Jennigs, Tom, Tom Jennings’ essay on c inema representations of European Asians & Muslims, 2005, http://libcom. org/library/ae-fond-kiss-dir-ken-loach-yasmin-dir-kenny-glenaan-head-dir-fatih-akin-film-review The Hindu Magazine, Being Asian, Muslim and British, Online edition of India's National Newspaper, 2003, http://www. hindu. com/mag/2004/11/14/stories/2004111400270200. htm ——————————— [ 1 ].Docherty, Alan, Yasmin – Kenny Glenaan, in Culture Wars, 2011, http://www. culturewars. org. uk/2004-02/yasmin. htm [ 2 ]. Docherty, Alan, Yasmin – Kenny Glenaan, in Culture Wars, 2011, http://www. culturewars. org. uk/2004-02/yasmin. htm [ 3 ]. Docherty, Alan, Yasmin – Kenny Glenaan, in Culture Wars, 2011, http://www. culturewars. org. uk/2004-02/yasmin. htm [ 4 ]. Dilks, Richard, Yasmin, in Close-Up Film, 2003, http://www. close-upfilm. com/reviews/y/yasmin. htm [ 5 ]. Docherty, Alan, Yasmin – Kenny Glenaan, in Culture Wars, 2011, http://www. culturewars. org. uk/2004-02/yasmin. tm [ 6 ]. Jennigs, Tom, Tom Jennings’ essay on cinema representations of European Asians & Muslims, 2005, http://libcom. org/library/ae-fond-kiss-dir-ken-loach-yasmin-dir-kenny-glenaan-head-dir-fatih-akin-film-review [ 7 ]. Dilks, Richard, Yasmin, in Close-Up Film, 2003, http://www. close-upfilm. com/reviews/y/yasmin. htm [ 8 ]. The Hindu Magazine, Being Asian, Muslim and British, Online edition of India's National Newspaper, 2003, http://www. hindu. com/mag/2004/11/14/stories/2004111400270200. htm [ 9 ]. Dilks, Richard, Yasmin, in Close-Up Film, 2003,

Monday, September 16, 2019

Dystopian World

The Houses of Parliament was now a ghost building; there had not been a government since the assassination of Prime Minister Smith, which was a good, yet sinister event, for it was PM Smith who had caused this global never-ending power cut. The situation PM Smith had left us in was abhorrent to us all. As I was looking at the vacated Houses of Parliament noticed the Victorian clock Big Ben had completely stopped. This eerie feature made the clock feel as if the world had stopped in this dramatic time change.It was as if time had stopped around me and I was the only person left on a deserted island. The rasping sound of the cold air that blew around me was high pitched. I knew vaguely that it was about 1 pm on an August afternoon, but there was, again, very little sun. The sun shining was a rare and distant thing. I looked up in desperation at the clouds and saw cascading radiation of light seeping through the dark clouds. I was about to turn away when suddenly I saw SST Pall's Cathed ral. The landmark dome had survived the bombings of WorldWar II where everything around it was crumbling away. This building showed the great British spirit during the war and represented how the building stayed strong, just like the country did throughout 1939-1945. However, this building was now smoking, the dark black smoke rose from the top like steam from a boiled kettle. I stumbled towards the building, trekking through the soft wet mud at the bottom of the river bank. As I got closer and closer, the smell of burning metal was flowing through my nose and could start to see that the top part of the dome was slowly burning away. S saddened to see such marvelous architecture burning away. This stirred emotional memories back to me from 2004 when I was a young boy growing up, when everything was perfect and the country was normal. I had come to the great City with my family for a River Cruise bringing my beloved teddy bear that I had since I was a day old. This bear had been every where with me but on this day the most awful thing happened which I remember so strongly to this day, that my bear had fallen out of my hands into the depths of the water.This feeling of utter deadness and loss falls upon me once more. The most popular City in the world had drastically changed into a grotesque, distorted waste. The City of London was gone and it would never be put right. All the worlds' power is no longer available. There were a few dead bodies frozen in time with rigorists and their bodies covered in film of despair. I looked down at one body and could see long strands of hair covering the pale hard skin. The body I was looking at was of a young girl who had been abandoned by her family because she was too weak to carry on walking.I crouched down and felt a desperate sadness and shiver run down my spine for I had never been this close to a dead person before. I brushed the hair to one side of her face and then I could see her lost, colorless eyes staring into space . The overwhelming feeling the small girl gave me meant could not stay for long and I soon got up and left her. I felt like the only man alive and was soon getting lonely and tired, knowing I was going to end up like that small, exposed girl.It was at that point felt specks of rain bouncing off my face and within a few minutes the heavens opened ND rain was cascading down like a waterfall. With no other clothes I had to find cover. I looked behind me and saw what used to be the famous London Eye. Quickly trekked through the mud until saw a glass cabin of one of the pods of the London Eye. Without contemplating the consequence that I might suffer I entered the murky glass pod and was now sheltered from the pouring rain. As I looked up at the pod the rain leapt off the sides in mass quantity. Ad never been in a war zone before but this is what London felt like. Every. Here I looked could see buildings reduced to ruins, my home being one of them and walls crumbled down into large rigid pieces and all the pathways had been disintegrated into mud baths. It was scary. I knew there was no one out there to kill me but I feared for my life because of the unnatural weather and conditions that has been thrown on planet earth. I lost my belief in God a long time ago but now found myself praying for this world to be changed back to what it used to be.Soon after the prayer I noticed that the rain had finally settled down and to my amazement through he clouds came the brightest sun. Got out of the cramped murky port of the London Eye and stood up. I could not believe my eyes, I felt like I was on the set of a movie, or a miracle was happening as a huge colorful rainbow went over the crumbling Houses of Parliament as if it were a sign. I stared at this rainbow with my mouth wide open. All seven colors looked immense and spiritual and for the first time in many years felt that the spread of new life, hope and security was being radiated over the land. Faith is truly a wonderfu l thing.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Animal Farm’s Totalitarian Leader Essay

Animal Farm’s leader, Napoleon, has all the power. He is able to build up and hold onto that power as a totalitarian leader, which is a central government that controls over all aspect of life. Napoleon did many different things to get to that power and hold onto it. Napoleon first took charge after the rebellion against Mr. Jones. He and Snowball, who was the other smart pig on the farm, wrote the seven commandments. The other animals don’t know how to read, so Snowball needed to read it to them. â€Å"Never mind the milk, comrades!† cried Napoleon.(Orwell 44). â€Å"So the animals marched down to the hayfield to begin harvest, and when they came back in the evening it was noticed that the milk had disappeared.†(44) † So the animals trooped down to the hayfield to begin the harvest, and when they came back in the evening it was noticed that the milk had disappeared.†(44) â€Å"Comrades!† he cried. â€Å"You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for YOUR sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back!†(52). Napoleon and Snowball sent squealer to strike the animals with fear that Jones might return, and stole the apple and milk from them because they â€Å"require it†. Napoleon took care of everyone who was a threat to him.† At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball, who only sprang from his place just in time to escape their snapping jaws.† (66) Napoleon got rid of Snowball because he was a threat to his power. Snowball was in favor of helping the farm, but Napoleon just wanted to get the power for himself.† To the amazement of everybody, three of them flung themselves upon Boxer. Boxer saw them coming and put out his great hoof, caught a dog in mid-air, and pinned him to the ground. The dog shrieked for mercy and the other two fled with their tails between their legs. Boxer looked at Napoleon to know whether he should crush the dog to death or let it go. Napoleon appeared to change countenance and sharply ordered Boxer to let the dog go, whereat Boxer lifted his hoof, and the dog slunk away, bruised and howling.†(92) Napoleon tried to get Boxer killed but Boxer did not realize that, that’s why Napoleon countenance. Napoleon tried to get Boxer killed because everyone looked up to him, and he was loyal to Napoleon. † ‘Alfred Simmonds, Horse Slaughterer and Glue Boiler, Willingdon. Dealer in Hides and Bone-Meal. Kennels Supplied.’ Do you not understand what that means? They are taking Boxer to the knacker’s!†(123).Everyone thought Napoleon was sending Boxer to the hospital, but really they were going to kill him. Napoleon tried keeping all of the animals dumb so it can be easier to take advantage of them. â€Å"It was the most affecting sight I have ever seen!† said Squealer, lifting his trotter and wiping away a tear. â€Å"I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end, almost too weak to speak, he whispered in my ear that his sole sorrow was to have passed on before the windmill was finished. ‘Forward, comrades!’ he whispered. â€Å"Forward in the name of the Rebellion.† Long live Animal Farm! Long live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right. †Those were his very last words, comrades.† Here Squealer’s demeanor suddenly changed. He fell silent for a moment, and his little eyes darted suspicious glances from side to side before he proceeded.†(125) Squealer easily lied to them about them taking Napoleon to the hospital. Napoleon changed the Seven Commandments without the animals knowing, because they were working too much to have time to read. The original Commandments were:†1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. 2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. 3. No animal shall wear clothes. 4. No animal shall sleep in a bed. 5. No animal shall drink alcohol. 6. No animal shall kill any other animal. 7. All animals are equal. â€Å"(43) In the end, Napoleon took them all out and left only one; Four legs good, Two legs better. Napoleon used many different techniques to build up and hold onto the power he has over Animal Farm. He kept the animals dumb, got rid of his threats and changed the commandments.

Saturday, September 14, 2019

Anglo-Saxon Religious Poetry

Anglo-Saxon Religious Poetry The influence of Christianity came to England from Ireland with the arrival of St. Augustine’mission. The ancient vernacular poetry unredeemed in its worldliness and paganism was sanctified by the Christianization of England. In consequence there was a marked change in the content and emotion of English poetry while leaving it form and general technique unaltered. Instead of seeking themes common to old-Germanic the Christianized Anglo-Saxons adopted a new world of Latin Christianity along with themes and attitudes common to entire Christian world.This enabled the Anglo-Saxon poets to work on Biblical stories, associating them with Hebrew imagination. The special class of poetry which is called Christian poetry and this religious poetry flourished in about the 8th century in North England. Alliterative verse came to the aid of clerkly Latin to give expression of the faith of the Laity and make it popular. The subject of the poet’s song is no w the story of Christ and the deeds of saintly heroes. Caedmon The English poet who took the first attempt to write poems on Christian themes was Caedmon.What scholars know of Caedmon's life comes from Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People. He is known best during the time fl. 658-680 AD. , and Bede tells us that he was an illiterate herdsman to a monastery of Whitby who one night in a dream learned how to sing beautiful Christian verses praising God's name. Following his dream, Caedmon became the foremost Christian poets. Earlier he had so little gift of song that he used to leave the feast when he found the harp approaching him he used to leave the feast.One night as he lay asleep in the stable a mysterious being appeared to him in his dreams and commanded him to sing. At his bidding Caedmon at once sang in praise of the Lord, the Creator, verses which he had never heard before. When he awoke he remembered these verses and made others like them. Thus the unlettered C aedmon was miraculously transformed into the first religious poet of England. Caedmon is remembered today for his poetic paraphrases of The Bible.He paraphrased in verse the book of Geneis, Exodus, Daniel and Judith. He is supposed to have sung about  creation of the world, the origin of man, his reign, of exodus, the incarnation, the crucifixion, the resurrection of Christ, the ascension of Christ into heaven, the advent of the Holy Ghost and the teaching of the apostles. He also sang of future judgement, the horrors of hell and the joys of heaven. Research and scholarship however, no longer admit all the poems attributed to Caedmon by Bede to be directly his work excepting the nine-lined poem quoted by Bede in his account of Caedmon’s first inspiration. Genesis A and B The most interesting of the poems in the Junius Manuscript is Genesis.Genesis A of 3000 lines is an account of Satan’s rebellion against God and his fall with the angels into Hell, narrating the subs tance of the first 22 chapters of the Biblical book of Genesis. The poem contains an interpolated passage of 600 lines strikingly different in language and style from the main body of the poem. This has been named Genesis B, a rudimentary Paradise Lost, describing the temptation of Adam and Eve, their Fall and Satan’s rebellion Exodus It relates to the escape of the Israelites and the destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea.It is boldly and vigorously written and has an older Epic note. It is written more in the convention of heroic poetry rather than scriptural lore. Exodus brings a traditional â€Å"heroic style† to its biblical subject-matter. Moses is treated as a general, and military imagery pervades the battle scenes. The destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea is narrated in much the same way as a formulaic battle scene from other Old English poems Daniel Daniel, as it is preserved, is 764 lines long. There have been numerous arguments that there was or iginally more to this poem than survives today.It is a paraphrase of the first five chapters of the Biblical book of Daniel. The poet uses his materials for homiletic purposes and tries to inculcate such Christian virtue. The primary focus of the Old English author was that of The Three Youths, Daniel and their encounters with the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II. Prosaic in tone, it also bears an interpolatory passage relating to the poem of Azariah. Judith The finest of the poem attributed to Caedmon is Judith of which a fragment of 350 lines, survive. It is a perfect poem full of action and passion.The Old English poem â€Å"Judith† describes the beheading of Assyrian general Holofernes by Israelite Judith of Bethulia. It is found in the same manuscript as the heroic poem Beowulf, the Nowell Codex, dated ca. 975-1025. The Old English poem is one of many retellings of the Holofernes-Judith tale as it was found in the Book of Judith, still present in the Catholic and Orthod ox Christian Bibles. What is certain about the origin of the poem is that it stems from the Book of Judith. After the Reformation, the Book of Judith was removed from the Protestant Bible.However, it is still present in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Bibles. Similar to Beowulf, Judith conveys a moral tale of heroic triumph over monstrous beings. Both moral and political, the poem tells of a brave woman’s efforts to save and protect her people. Judith is depicted as an exemplar woman, grounded by ideal morale, probity, courage, and religious conviction. Judith's character is rendered blameless and virtuous, and her beauty is praised persistently throughout the poem.Cynaewulf Beside Caedmon, the other most important Old-English religious poet is Cynaewulf. Cynewulf lived roughly c.770-840 AD, yet very little is known about his life. The only information scholars have on Cynewulf's life is what they can discover from his poetry. Two of Cynewulf's signed poems were disco vered in the Vercelli Book, which includes Cynewulf's holy cross poem â€Å"Elene† as well as Dream of the Rood. Where many scholars will argue that all of the poems in the Vercelli are in fact Cynewulf's, the noted German scholar Franz Dietrich demonstrates that the similarities between Cynewulf's â€Å"Elene† and The Dream of the Rood reveals that the two must have been authored by the same individual.The four poems attributed to him trough his runic signatures are Christ. Juliana, Elene and The Fate of the Apostles. Unsigned poems attributed to him or his school are Andreas, St. Guthlac, The Phoenix, The Dream of the Rood. The four poems, like a substantial portion of Anglo-Saxon poetry, are sculpted in alliterative verse. All four poems draw upon Latin sources such as homilies and hagiographies (the lives of saints) for their content, and this is to be particularly contrasted to other Old English poems, e. g.Genesis, Exodus, and Daniel, which are drawn directly fro m the Bible as opposed to secondary accounts. Christ Of all his works the most important and popular poem is Christ, a fragmentary didactic poem in three parts – the first celebrating the Nativity, the second Ascension and the third Doomsday, narrating the torments of the wicked and the joys of the redeemed. Andreas and Guthlac These are poems related to lives of Saints. The first narrates the story of the adventures and sufferings and success of St. Andreas in his travels related to missionary work. Juliana and EleneThese are legendary stories of St. Juliana and the discovery of the True Cross by the mother of Emperor Constantine, St. Helena. They are poems with little artistic merit except for their adventurous element and the rareness in Anglo-Saxon poetry of being dedicated to women. In terms of length, Elene is by far the longest poem of Cynewulf’s corpus at 1,321 lines. It is followed by Juliana, at 731 lines, Christ II, at 427 lines, and The Fates of the Apostle s, at a brisk 122 lines. Three of the poems are â€Å"martyrolical,† in that the central character(s) in each die/suffer for their religious values.In Elene, Saint Helena endures her quest to find the Holy Cross and spread Christianity; in Juliana, the title character dies after she refuses to marry a pagan man, thus retaining her Christian integrity; in Fates of the Apostles, the speaker creates a song that meditates on the deaths of the apostles which they â€Å"joyously faced. † Elene and Juliana fit in the category of poems that depict the lives of saints. These two poems along with Andreas and Guthlac (parts A and B) constitute the only versified saints' legends in the Old English vernacular.The Ascension (Christ II) is outside the umbrella of the other three works, and is a vehement description of a devotional subject. The exact chronology of the poems is not known. One argument asserts that Elene is likely the last of the poems because the â€Å"autobiographica l† epilogue implies that Cynewulf is old at the time of composition, but this view has been doubted. Nevertheless, it seems that Christ II and Elene represent the cusp of Cynewulf’s career, while Juliana and Fates of the Apostles seem to be created by a less inspired, and perhaps less mature, poet.The Fates of the Apostles It deals with the various Christian Gospels in an Elegiac manner. It is the shortest of Cynewulf’s known canon at 122 lines long. It is a brief martyrology of the Twelve Apostles written in the standard alliterative verse. The Fates recites the key events that subsequently befell each apostle after the Ascension. It is possible that The Fates was composed as a learning aid to the monasteries. Cynewulf speaks in the first-person throughout the poem, and besides explaining the fate of each disciple, he provides â€Å"advice† and â€Å"consolation† to the reader.Cynewulf’s runic signature is scrambled in this poem so that the meaning of the runes become a riddle with no unequivocal meaning. Runic signature All four of Cynewulf's poems contain passages where the letters of the poet’s name are woven into the text using runic symbols that also double as meaningful ideas pertinent to the text. In Juliana and Elene, the interwoven name is spelled in the more recognizable form as Cynewulf, while in Fates and Christ II it is observed without the medial e so the runic acrostic says Cynwulf.The practice of claiming authorship over one’s poems was a break from the tradition of the anonymous poet, where no composition was viewed as being owned by its creator. Cynewulf devised a tradition where authorship would connote ownership of the piece and an originality that would be respected by future generations. Furthermore, by integrating his name, Cynewulf was attempting to retain the structure and form of his poetry that would â€Å"undergo mutations† otherwise. From a different perspective, Cynewu lf’s intent may not have been to claim authorship, but to â€Å"seek the prayers of others for the safety of his soul.†It is contended that Cynewulf wished to be remembered in the prayers of his audience in return for the pleasure they would derive from his poems. In a sense his expectation of a spiritual reward can be contrasted with the material reward that other poets of his time would have expected for their craft. The Phoenix The poem is about a mythical bird which burnt itself to be reborn from its own ashes, symbolic of Christian soul. The Dream of the Rood The poem is set up with the narrator having a dream. In this dream or vision he is speaking to the Cross on which Jesus was crucified.The poem itself is divided up into three separate sections. In section one, the narrator has a vision of the Cross. Initially when the dreamer sees the Cross, he notes how it is covered with gems. He is aware of how wretched he is compared to how glorious the tree is. However, he comes to see that amidst the beautiful stones it is stained with blood In section two, the Cross shares its account of Jesus’ death. The Crucifixion story is told from the perspective of the Cross. It begins with the enemy coming to cut the tree down and carrying it away.The tree learns that it is to be the bearer of a criminal, but instead the Christ comes to be crucified. The Lord and the Cross become one, and they stand together as victors, refusing to fall, taking on insurmountable pain for the sake of mankind. It is not just Christ, but the Cross as well that is pierced with nails. The Rood and Christ are one in the portrayal of the Passion—they are both pierced with nails, mocked and tortured. Then, just like with Christ, the Cross is resurrected, and adorned with gold and silver. It is honored above all trees just as Jesus is honored above all men.The Cross then charges the visionary to share all that he has seen with others. In section three, the author give s his reflections about this vision. The vision ends, and the man is left with his thoughts. He gives praise to God for what he has seen and is filled with hope for eternal life and his desire to once again be near the glorious Cross. It is the finest of religious poems in OE, the finest narrative of the Passion in medieval verse (late 7th century, later modified; preserved in the Vercelli Book). The tree of which the Cross was made relates the story the first English dream-poem Anglo-Saxon Religious Poetry The influence of Christianity came to England from Ireland with the arrival of St. Augustine’mission. The ancient vernacular poetry unredeemed in its worldliness and paganism was sanctified by the Christianization of England. In consequence there was a marked change in the content and emotion of English poetry while leaving it form and general technique unaltered.Instead of seeking themes common to old-Germanic the Christianized Anglo-Saxons adopted a new world of Latin Christianity along with themes and attitudes common to entire Christian world. This enabled the Anglo-Saxon poets to work on Biblical stories, associating them with Hebrew imagination. The special class of poetry which is called Christian poetry and this religious poetry flourished in about the 8th century in North England. Alliterative verse came to the aid of clerkly Latin to give expression of the faith of the Laity and make it popular. The subject of the poet’s song is now the story of Christ and the deeds of saintly heroes.CaedmonThe English poet who took the first attempt to write poems on Christian themes was Caedmon. What scholars know of Caedmon's life comes from Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People. He is known best during the time fl. 658-680 AD., and Bede tells us that he was an illiterate herdsman to a monastery of Whitby who one night in a dream learned how to sing beautiful Christian verses praising God's name. Following his dream, Caedmon became the foremost Christian poets. Earlier he had so little gift of song that he used to leave the feast when he found the harp approaching him he used to leave the feast. One night as he lay asleep in the stable a mysterious being appeared to him in his dreams and commanded him to sing.At his bidding Caedmon at once sang in praise of the Lord, the Creator, verses which he had never heard before. When he awoke he remembered these verses and made others like them. Thus the unlettered Caedmon was miraculously transfo rmed into the first religious poet of England. Caedmon is remembered today for his poetic paraphrases of The Bible. He paraphrased in verse the book of Geneis, Exodus, Daniel and Judith. He is supposed to have sung about  creation of the world, the origin of man, his reign, of exodus, the incarnation, the crucifixion, the resurrection of Christ, the ascension of Christ into heaven, the advent of the Holy Ghost and the teaching of the apostles.He also sang of future judgement, the horrors of hell and the joys of heaven. Research and scholarship however, no longer admit all the poems attributed to Caedmon by Bede to be directly his work excepting the nine-lined poem quoted by Bede in his account of Caedmon’s first inspiration.Genesis A and BThe most interesting of the poems in the Junius Manuscript is Genesis. Genesis A of 3000 lines is an account of Satan’s rebellion against God and his fall with the angels into Hell, narrating the substance of the first 22 chapters o f the Biblical book of Genesis. The poem contains an interpolated passage of 600 lines strikingly different in language and style from the main body of the poem. This has been named Genesis B, a rudimentary Paradise Lost, describing the temptation of Adam and Eve, their Fall and Satan’s rebellionExodusIt relates to the escape of the Israelites and the destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea. It is boldly and vigorously written and has an older Epic note. It is written more in the convention of heroic poetry rather than scriptural lore. Exodus brings a traditional â€Å"heroic style† to its biblical subject-matter. Moses is treated as a general, and military imagery pervades the battle scenes. The destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea is narrated in much the same way as a formulaic battle scene from other Old English poemsDanielDaniel, as it is preserved, is 764 lines long. There have been numerous arguments that there was originally more to this poem than sur vives today.It is a paraphrase of the first five chapters of the Biblical book of Daniel. The poet uses his materials for homiletic purposes and tries to inculcate such Christian virtue. The primary focus of the Old English author was that of The Three Youths, Daniel and their encounters with the Babylonian king  Nebuchadnezzar II. Prosaic in tone, it also bears an interpolatory passage relating to the poem of Azariah.JudithThe finest of the poem attributed to Caedmon is Judith of which a fragment of 350 lines, survive. It is a perfect poem full of action and passion. The Old English poem â€Å"Judith† describes the beheading of Assyrian general Holofernes by Israelite Judith of Bethulia. It is found in the same manuscript as the heroic poem Beowulf, the Nowell Codex, dated ca. 975-1025. The Old English poem is one of many retellings of the Holofernes-Judith tale as it was found in the Book of Judith, still present in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian Bibles.What is certa in about the origin of the poem is that it stems from the Book of Judith. After the Reformation, the Book of Judith was removed from the Protestant Bible. However, it is still present in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Bibles.Similar to Beowulf, Judith conveys a moral tale of heroic triumph over monstrous beings. Both moral and political, the poem tells of a brave woman’s efforts to save and protect her people. Judith is depicted as an exemplar woman, grounded by ideal morale, probity, courage, and religious conviction. Judith's character is rendered blameless and virtuous, and her beauty is praised persistently throughout the poem.CynaewulfBeside Caedmon, the other most important Old-English religious poet is Cynaewulf. Cynewulf lived roughly c. 770-840 AD, yet very little is known about his life.The only information scholars have on Cynewulf's life is what they can discover from his poetry. Two of Cynewulf's signed poems were discovered in the Vercelli Book, which i ncludes Cynewulf's holy cross poem â€Å"Elene† as well as Dream of the Rood.Where many scholars will argue that all of the poems in the Vercelli are in fact Cynewulf's, the noted German scholar Franz Dietrich demonstrates that the similarities between Cynewulf's â€Å"Elene† and The Dream of the Rood reveals that the two must have been authored by the same individual. The four poems attributed to him trough his runic signatures are Christ. Juliana, Elene and The Fate of the Apostles.Unsigned poems attributed to him or his school are Andreas, St. Guthlac, The Phoenix, The Dream of the Rood. The four poems, like a substantial portion of Anglo-Saxon poetry, are sculpted in alliterative verse. All four poems draw upon Latin sources such as homilies and hagiographies (the lives of saints) for their content, and this is to be particularly contrasted to other Old English poems, e.g. Genesis, Exodus, and Daniel, which are drawn directly from the Bible as opposed to secondary accounts.ChristOf all his works the most important and popular poem is Christ, a fragmentary didactic poem in three parts – the first celebrating the Nativity, the second Ascension and the third Doomsday, narrating the torments of the wicked and the joys of the redeemed.Andreas and GuthlacThese are poems related to lives of Saints. The first narrates the story of the adventures and sufferings and success of St. Andreas in his travels related to missionary work.Juliana and EleneThese are legendary stories of St. Juliana and the discovery of the True Cross by the mother of Emperor Constantine, St. Helena. They are poems with little artistic merit except for their adventurous element and the rareness in Anglo-Saxon poetry of being dedicated to women. In terms of length, Elene is by far the longest poem of Cynewulf’s corpus at 1,321 lines. It is followed by Juliana, at 731 lines, Christ II, at 427 lines, and The Fates of the Apostles, at a brisk 122 lines. Three of the poe ms are â€Å"martyrolical,† in that the central character(s) in each die/suffer for their religious values.In Elene, Saint Helena endures her quest to find the Holy Cross and spread Christianity; in Juliana, the title character dies after she refuses to marry a pagan man, thus retaining her Christian integrity; in Fates of the Apostles, the speaker creates a song that meditates on the deaths of the apostles which they â€Å"joyously faced.† Elene and Juliana fit in the category of poems that depict the lives of saints. These two poems along with Andreas  and Guthlac (parts A and B) constitute the only versified saints' legends in the Old English vernacular.The Ascension (Christ II) is outside the umbrella of the other three works, and is a vehement description of a devotional subject. The exact chronology of the poems is not known. One argument asserts that Elene is likely the last of the poems because the â€Å"autobiographical† epilogue implies that Cynewulf is old at the time of composition, but this view has been doubted. Nevertheless, it seems that Christ II and Elene represent the cusp of Cynewulf’s career, while Juliana and Fates of the Apostles seem to be created by a less inspired, and perhaps less mature, poet. The Fates of the ApostlesIt deals with the various Christian Gospels in an Elegiac manner. It is the shortest of Cynewulf’s known canon at 122 lines long. It is a brief martyrology of the Twelve Apostles written in the standard alliterative verse. The Fates recites the key events that subsequently befell each apostle after the Ascension. It is possible that The Fates was composed as a learning aid to the monasteries. Cynewulf speaks in the first-person throughout the poem, and besides explaining the fate of each disciple, he provides â€Å"advice† and â€Å"consolation† to the reader. Cynewulf’s runic signature is scrambled in this poem so that the meaning of the runes become a riddle w ith no unequivocal meaning.Runic signatureAll four of Cynewulf's poems contain passages where the letters of the poet’s name are woven into the text using runic symbols that also double as meaningful ideas pertinent to the text. In Juliana and Elene, the interwoven name is spelled in the more recognizable form as Cynewulf, while in Fates and Christ II it is observed without the medial e so the runic acrostic says Cynwulf. The practice of claiming authorship over one’s poems was a break from the tradition of the anonymous poet, where no composition was viewed as being owned by its creator. Cynewulf devised a tradition where authorship would connote ownership of the piece and an originality that would be respected by future generations.Furthermore, by integrating his name, Cynewulf was attempting to retain the structure and form of his poetry that would â€Å"undergo mutations† otherwise. From a different perspective, Cynewulf’s intent may not have been to claim authorship, but to â€Å"seek the  prayers of others for the safety of his soul.† It is contended that Cynewulf wished to be remembered in the prayers of his audience in return for the pleasure they would derive from his poems. In a sense his expectation of a spiritual reward can be contrasted with the material reward that other poets of his time would have expected for their craft.The PhoenixThe poem is about a mythical bird which burnt itself to be reborn from its own ashes, symbolic of Christian soul.The Dream of the RoodThe poem is set up with the narrator having a dream. In this dream or vision he is speaking to the Cross on which Jesus was crucified. The poem itself is divided up into three separate sections. In section one, the narrator has a vision of the Cross. Initially when the dreamer sees the Cross, he notes how it is covered with gems. He is aware of how wretched he is compared to how glorious the tree is. However, he comes to see that amidst the beautif ul stones it is stained with blood In section two, the Cross shares its account of Jesus’ death.The Crucifixion story is told from the perspective of the Cross. It begins with the enemy coming to cut the tree down and carrying it away. The tree learns that it is to be the bearer of a criminal, but instead the Christ comes to be crucified. The Lord and the Cross become one, and they stand together as victors, refusing to fall, taking on insurmountable pain for the sake of mankind. It is not just Christ, but the Cross as well that is pierced with nails. The Rood and Christ are one in the portrayal of the Passion—they are both pierced with nails, mocked and tortured. Then, just like with Christ, the Cross is resurrected, and adorned with gold and silver. It is honored above all trees just as Jesus is honored above all men.The Cross then charges the visionary to share all that he has seen with others. In section three, the author gives his reflections about this vision. Th e vision ends, and the man is left with his thoughts. He gives praise to God for what he has seen and is filled with hope for eternal life and his desire to once again be near the glorious Cross. It is the finest of religious poems in OE, the finest narrative of the Passion in medieval verse (late 7th century, later modified; preserved in the Vercelli Book). The tree of which the Cross was made relates the story the first English dream-poem  Christ is portrayed as a young Germanic hero:Long years ago (well yet I remember)   They hewed me down on the edge of the holt, Severed my trunk; strong foemen took me, For a spectacle wrought me, a gallows for rogues. High on their shoulders they bore me to hilltop, Fastened me firmly, an army of foes!   ‘Then I saw the King of all mankind In brave mood hastening to mount upon me. Refuse I dared not, nor bow nor break, Though I felt earth's confines shudder in fear; All foes I might fell, yet still I stood fast.   ‘T hen the young Warrior, God, the All-Wielder, Put off his raiment, steadfast and strong; With lordly mood in the sight of many He mounted the Cross to redeem mankind. When the hero clasped me I trembled in terror,   But I dared not bow me nor bend to earth; I must need stand fast. Upraised as the Rood I held the High King, the Lord of Heaven. I dared not bow! with black nails driven Those sinners pierced me; the prints are clear,   The open wounds. I dared injure none. They mocked us both. I was wet with blood From the Hero's side when He sent forth His spirit. ‘Many a bale I bore on that hill-side Seeing the Lord in agony outstretched.   Black darkness covered with clouds God's body, That radiant splendor. Shadow went forth Wan under heaven; all creation wept Bewailing the King's death. Christ was on the Cross.It appears from a survey of Old English Christian poetry that the poets chiefly aimed at popularizing the holy writ and only occasionally added pious commentaries to the original.

Friday, September 13, 2019

Autobiography Essay Essay Example for Free

Autobiography Essay Essay Many people in today’s society think just because I am a young lady I have an easy fun filled life. Well, that is not true. Life has many ups and downs but it is up to us whether we want it to be a successful one or not. Life is filled with obstacles for us to overcome no matter how tragic. Back in 2009, the most unexpected tragedy I thought that would never happen occurred. My grandfather died in September and my grandmother died in December. It was a hard and difficult time for me because they both died within a matter of four months apart from each other. Another incident occurred that was almost fatal. My brother was involved in a car accident in Kemp Road last year May. The accident was so horrific, the right side of his body was paralyzed. He had to do therapy at Doctors Hospital so he could drive and walk properly again. Sometime in everyone’s life, they are either nervous or scared to take an examination. I had my experience of nervousness when I had to take my national examination. In the Bahamas, the national examination is a test students would have to take for the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (B.G.C.S.E.) or the Bahamas Junior Certificate (B.J.C.). The exam I had to take was Music which consists of theory and a practical exam. Theory means to listen to a musical piece and answer questions about it and practical means to play a musical piece. When it was my turn to perform my musical piece, I panicked but I tried my best to keep calm. Yes, millions of butterflies were in my stomach just like any other person would have before a big exam like that one. As I played my piece, the millions of butterflies I was experiencing were decreasing by each note I played. By the time as I finished playing my piece, I was confident I passed and I did with a B. One of my greatest successes I achieved in my life is graduating from Aquinas College Catholic High School and receiving my diploma. I was very  satisfied with my accomplishment and achievement and made my parents proud. My other success in life is obtaining my driver’s license. For a teenager, having your license is a big deal because it is one step closer to freedom. Most persons could not say they have their first godchild until the age of 30, but I had the privilege of having my first godchild at the age of 16. Her name is Danielle Rigby and she is my pride and joy. Some other successes in my life are cooking and playing the flute from the age of 10, playing my clarinet from the age of 15 and being accepted into the great Bethune Cookman University. Some of the Bahamian dishes I can make are curry chicken and white rice, friend plankton, potato salad, BBQ ribs, minced lobster and many more. I have been playing the flute for nine years and counting, and I treat it just like a young baby. My future goals and aspirations are to graduate from college with honors, obtain a career where I can prove I am worth being there by working to the best of my ability and having a family of my own someday. All of these things I went through to become the young lady I am today. This is my life, my story. Autobiography Essay. (2016, Apr 24).

How does Starbuck or IKEA create the customer experience in their Essay

How does Starbuck or IKEA create the customer experience in their marketing - Essay Example It is evidently clear from the discussion that customer experience is generated when the customer engages in â€Å"contact† with the company. This contact can be generated â€Å"directly†, that is through purchase of product/service, use of product/service and after sales service provided by the company. Contact can also be created â€Å"indirectly† where customer experience is created through means such as advertisement, promotion, reviews and recommendations. The internet is becoming an important tool in forming an indirect contact between the company and its customers and hence in creating customer experience in this modern business landscape. A flourishing customer experience can be created by entrenching all the company’s products with the company’s core value proposition. Another important nugget is that the expectations of the customer are shaped in part by the type of experience they’ve had with the company recently. So if they had a good experience, they will expect more out of the company and its product offerings. IKEA goes out of the way to create customer experience for its customers. Its website is welcoming and easy to navigate. It guides the customer through the whole process of coming to IKEA and making a purchase from the store. Things like â€Å"make a list before you leave home† and â€Å"make yourselves at home† serve to engage the customer in a warm and trusting relationship. Further, IKEA has an in-store restaurant in case customers get hungry. They also have a play area for kids where parents can leave them under supervision and shop at the store in peace. These little things may not seem much, but added up they add immense positive value to the store’s customer experience. They also offer very competitive prices for their products and make the whole process easier for the customers by allowing them to pay through several different modes; any of which is more convenient to th e customer. Recently, IKEA has also launched an application for its catalogue to increase customer experience. The company has picked up on the changing trends and increasing reliance on and usage of cell phones and thus has launched a mobile app which will enable customers to â€Å"browse IKEA’s product range, check product information and stock availability†. Furthermore, what really makes IKEA great is it’s in-depth and accurate understanding of its customers. The store already incorporates everything the customer might need and keeps updating according to customer needs frequently. According to Berry et al., an important part of customer value is the emotional aspect of it. Although functionality is also important, emotions need to be managed with increased thoroughness to reap continuous benefits and form valuable and lasting relationships with the customer. But this effort will have to be thoroughly implied throughout the organization in order to show resu lts; simply â€Å"tweaking† and putting in â€Å"isolated pockets† will not have the desired positive effects and result in a failed attempt to gain advantage of fruitful customer relations. In this aspect, IKEA puts forward one of its best moves as being a child friendly store.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

American Nurses Association Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

American Nurses Association - Essay Example Potential conflicts might arise from intra-professional integrity, collective responsibility, assertion of values, responsibilities to the public, implementing professional standards in clinical, administrative and educational practice, responsibility for care environment, influencing the environment with moral virtues and values, preserving integrity and ethical character, maintaining confidentiality, responsibility and accountability in judgment and action etc. There could be many areas of conflict when others employees, care givers and family members are involved. Conflicts could be avoided by understanding, collaboration and co-operation with other care-givers, by being flexible without compromising the nursing ethics and with a thoroughly psychological insight of the problems. A complete understanding of duties and responsibilities and genuinely caring for patients will win the battle any day without giving scope for conflict and aggression. In this document, there is no reference how the rights are secured; but there is a promise that they are secured in every hospital. Patient's rights are protected and secured by State and Federal laws and hospitals who are obliged to protect the privacy of medical information and records. The governments and the hospitals are responsible for protecting all rights of every patient under all the circumstances. Health for life with safety, dignity and privacy and affordable care are the major rights of the patient. Availability of the best information, highest quality care with efficiency focusing on wellness, trained care providers, Clean and safe environment, help with bills and filling insurance claims, latest technology, cutting-edge medical research, well-equipped facilities, freedom of choice without bias and health provision at right time are the rights of all patients. Preparing the patient and the family with proper information and medical necessities too are the rights of the patients. Patient is provided legal help if he or his family members feel that the patient was not cared for. It can result in suspension of care givers and the hospital could be liable to claims. Patients and their families can claim compensation and if the allegations are proved beyond suspicion of willful neglect, care givers could face imprisonment. Patient rights are connected with the caregiver duties. They are supposed to be in touch with the most recent technology and research of continued progress, and it is their duty that patient is given all possible information, medication, and it is patient's right to make his choice. Duties and rights are connected with one another and they form the basic of patient and professional care relationship. Q. 3: Resource allocation is done by the panel of experts and administration after assessing the medical expenses involved. No one person is given the right of making all the decisions. Usually all the caring professions are involved before the allocation is made. Advisory committees are involved with the decision making on resource allocation and it is not an